Alok Prasanna Kumar (for Info only, not official)

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Alok Prasanna Kumar

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    ... In the way in which it has handled Hadiya’s case, the Supreme Court has made a mockery of notions of justice. A shocking and unconscionable judgment of a Division Bench of the Kerala High Court, which annulled the marriage of two consenting adults with no legal justification, denied the agency of an adult woman forcing her into the unlawful custody of her parents, and peddled unfounded conspiracy theory as fact, has not only been allowed to stand by the Supreme Court but perpetuated. When the Kerala High Court judgment was appealed by Shafin Jahan, Hadiya’s husband, not only did the Supreme Court ignore the illegality staring it in the face, it actually widened the scope of the wild-goose chase by setting the National Investigation Agency loose in this matter. ...

    Indian Express on Dec. 2, 2017, 12:15 a.m.

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    ...Illustration: C R Sasikumar The right to privacy is not just a common law right, not just a legal right, not just a fundamental right under the Constitution. It is a natural right inherent in every individual. This, in sum, is the law laid down by a nine-judge bench of the Supreme Court of India in K. Puttaswamy v Union of India. This finding of the Supreme Court has not come out of the blue. It is the inevitable conclusion of steady developments in the law in the last three decades where courts across the country, not just the apex court, have said that the right to privacy, to choose, to be free of unwanted intrusion and to determine what happens to their information, is a fundamental right under the Constitution. The judgment has consolidated the development of the law into a grand judgment of six concurring opinions that definitively lays down these principles. The judgment is also part of the changing view of the Supreme Court on what are fundamental rights. ...

    Indian Express on Aug. 25, 2017, 12:13 a.m.


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    ... The first thing to know when talking about privacy in India is that a majority of the population does not always understand what it means. It is at times confused with shame. It’s also confused with the emotion we feel when we do something that does not meet our standards or our sense of what is right. Modern Indian languages do not seem to have an exact word which captures the meaning of privacy; they’re usually some variation of the words for isolation, intimacy or secrecy, once again hinting at a conceptual confusion. This explains the reactions of many who wonder what’s the big deal about privacy because they have nothing to hide from the government anyway. ...

    Indian Express on July 31, 2017, 12:05 a.m.