Alyssa Ayres (for Info only, not official)

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Alyssa Ayres

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    ... President Donald J. Trump is on his first official trip to Asia, with stops in Japan, South Korea, China, and now Vietnam, for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC) summit. In his address to the APEC CEO Summit, he outlined his stamp on Asia statecraft, which includes a vision of upholding a “free and open Indo-Pacific.” However, the United States cannot achieve that goal without strong Asian partnerships—including with India. Though India is not on the president’s Asia itinerary, the nomenclature alone—Indo-Pacific rather than Asia-Pacific—suggests that New Delhi stands rightly to play a central part in the Trump administration’s larger Asia strategy. With long-standing allies like Japan, South Korea and Australia, India offers democratic and economic ballast to deal with the rise of China’s power. ...

    Indian Express on Nov. 13, 2017, 11:49 a.m.

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    ...President Donald J. Trump is on his first official trip to Asia, with stops in Japan, South Korea, China, and now Vietnam, for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC) summit. In his address to the APEC CEO Summit, he outlined his stamp on Asia statecraft, which includes a vision of upholding a “free and open Indo-Pacific.” However, the United States cannot achieve that goal without strong Asian partnerships—including with India. Though India is not on the president’s Asia itinerary, the nomenclature alone—Indo-Pacific rather than Asia-Pacific—suggests that New Delhi stands rightly to play a central part in the Trump administration’s larger Asia strategy. With long-standing allies like Japan, South Korea and Australia, India offers democratic and economic ballast to deal with the rise of China’s power. Sadly, US economic policy appears disconnected from the administration’s broader strategic goal. ...

    Indian Express on Nov. 12, 2017, 10:54 a.m.

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    ... Last Friday, US President Donald J. Trump tweeted, “Starting to develop a much better relationship with Pakistan and its leaders. I want to thank them for their cooperation on many fronts.” The tweet appeared following the dramatic rescue—by the Pakistani military—of an American-Canadian family held hostage for five years by the Haqqani Network terrorist group. In India, where people watch US-Pakistan ties more closely than the average American, debate immediately erupted about whether the United States had made a U-turn less than two months after announcing a tough policy on Pakistan-based terror. (Rahul Gandhi even quipped on Twitter that “President Trump needs another hug” from Modi, suggesting that praise for Pakistan somehow put New Delhi on the outside.) In truth, the tweet contains no big message on US policy toward Pakistan. ...

    Indian Express on Oct. 19, 2017, 8:03 a.m.

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    ... As prime minister Narendra Modi arrives in Washington for his first meeting with President Donald Trump, he will find an America rethinking its global leadership role, looking more inward as it scopes its sights down to America First. It’s a strange moment for the world, as New Delhi has long bet on closer ties with a United States confident of its traditional outward-looking posture. While much has been written about China’s willingness to step into the global leadership gap vacated by Trump’s foreign policy, India’s quiet commitment to becoming a “leading power” also deserves attention. In a nutshell, even as the world’s oldest democracy steps back from the global stage, the world’s largest democracy is stepping up. India has been among the few areas of bipartisan consensus in US foreign policy. Over the past twenty years, Democratic and Republican governments alike have worked to expand ties with New Delhi. ...

    Indian Express on June 26, 2017, 2 a.m.

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    ...For that matter, in no previous US election did a major party candidate release a campaign ad in Hindi. Or attend a Bollywood-and-anti-terrorism-themed jubilee in Edison, New Jersey. The Trump administration thus heads into office positively disposed towards India, and will likely continue to pursue stronger ties with the world’s largest democracy, in keeping with a general bipartisan consensus on India. But Trump has signalled throughout his campaign that he will focus on “America First”. The direction the US takes will affect US-India ties as a result. India will likely benefit from impending geopolitical shifts, but will likely find itself at odds with a balance-sheet approach to trade and economic policies. From the George W. Bush administration forward, the US has actively supported India’s rise towards great power status and a larger role in the world. ...

    Live Mint on Nov. 14, 2016, 1:38 a.m.