Anil Dharker (for Info only, not official)

author

Anil Dharker

We are collecting authors'profile. As soon as we get, we update it. Please note this is not official profile. The information including photo is collected from web.

| Contact |

| twitter |

| Linkedin |

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...Japan introduced its high-speed Shinkansen line between Tokyo and Osaka as long ago as 1964. Its top speed then was 210 km/hr; it’s now 350 km/hr. Since the first Bullet Train made its debut, 10 other countries have developed a high-speed network, the biggest being China’s (89 tracks covering 26,783 km against Japan’s 17 tracks covering 3,041 km). Other countries with high-speed trains include France, Germany, Italy, Spain, South Korea and even Turkey. None of them uses the Shinkansen system — so is Japanese technology really the best? There seems to have been no technical evaluation comparing other available systems, so are we embarking on a project of over Rs one lakh crore on blind faith? But even assuming that the Shinkansen system is comparable to any other technology on offer, how does it help Indian engineering to take a big leap forward as has been claimed by government sources? There is an interesting comparison here. ...

    Indian Express on Sept. 23, 2017, 12:10 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ... “If the heavens fall, what can we do?” That about sums up what an irate Mumbai Municipal Commissioner said to the media after Tuesday’s floods. In a way, Ajoy Mehta’s angry response was justified. All day long, every television channel was beaming footage of flooded streets, marooned cars, stationary trains, men and women wading through water. Television “experts” (me included) heaped blame on the BMC. The more aggressive channels shouted, “Municipal Commissioner, give us our Rs 440 crore back!” that being the sum supposedly spent on flood control measures. What Mehta saw were the positives: All the BMC services were running — there was BEST power, water supply, only one wall collapse. All the water pumps functioned faultlessly so that 9,000 million litres of water (equal to two Tulsi lakes) were pumped out in five hours. All this was achieved because municipal employees worked tirelessly. ...

    Indian Express on Sept. 2, 2017, 12:05 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...But an irrational confidence in the future is what keeps us going, doesn’t it? By any standard, 2016 has been an awful year. The rise of uncontrollable terrorism in the name of Islam has polarised nations and has made the liberal state an anomaly. The Brexit vote in Britain, which overcame all logical economic objections, has mired the UK into an uncertain future. The arguments that won the vote were all based on falsehoods — like a sudden influx of immigrants from the European Union, especially Turkey (therefore, Muslims); the amount of money going out from Britain every day as “subsidy” for EU, and so on. Prejudices and lies posing as facts have trumped rationality and truth. ...

    Deccan Chronicle on Jan. 2, 2017, 12:35 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...His point was well made: of the sanctioned strength, the vacancies of high court judges is 41.3%, in lower courts 22.8%, and in the Supreme Court 16.1%. There’s no doubt that successive governments must take the blame for delaying these appointments, but is the judiciary itself completely blameless for the increasing backlog of cases in our courts? Last year, the Supreme Court shot down the National Judicial Appointments Commission, a bill which was unanimously passed by Parliament and ratified by 20 states. The Court, instead, reverted to the collegium system whereby only senior judges of the Supreme Court decide on judicial appointments. Put bluntly, the judiciary was guarding its own turf. ...

    TOI on Sept. 18, 2016, 12:03 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...She was also for a while a Congress MP.Returning from a recent visit to Pakistan, she was asked to comment on a statement by defence minister Manohar Parrikar.Mr Parrikar, whose title should really be changed to offence minister, had said: “Pakistan is hell”.Ramya’s response was: “I respectfully disagree, Pakistan is not hell.” She added that people there were very similar to people in India: warm, friendly and extremely hospitable.Such observations have been made by many Indians who have visited Pakistan, and I am sure Pakistani visitors to India must say the same things about us when they get back home.But, and here’s the big but, these fairly commonplace observations were made before hyper-nationalism became a part of the Indian scene.The instant reaction in these changed times was to slap sedition charges on Ramya.All credit to her for not backing down despite threats and abuse directed at her.What is sedition? ...

    Deccan Chronicle on Sept. 7, 2016, 12:20 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...Sindhu and Sakshi Malik, thank you for giving us reasons to exhale.But they weren’t the only ones we should be grateful to: earlier there were a number of close calls: The women archers, for example, lost in a tie-breaker, as did Abhinav Bindra who almost added a bronze to his London gold (the only Indian individual gold medal winner in the history of the Games).Dipa Karmakar shocked the gymnastic world by coming from nowhere to almost win the bronze in the women’s vault, while Srikanth Kidambi beat players ranked well above him to reach the badminton singles quarters.But we shouldn’t only be looking at medals won or medals narrowly lost: there were other performances by our athletes we should be proud of, only if we had eyes to see.These performances stand out because they go beyond what we should realistically expect from our sportsmen and women.Lalita Babar, for example, may have finished only 10th in the 3,000 metres steeplechase, but she was the first woman athlete from India to reach an Olympic track final since P.T.Usha in 1984. ...

    Deccan Chronicle on Aug. 25, 2016, 2:42 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...If we look at our 15 individual medals (excluding the two of Pritchard), as many as five have come from wrestling and four from shooting.It is clear where our strength lies. So the gold turned to silver.No matter, because it was really the bronze which became silver: Until Rio, three Indian women had won the bronze (Karnam Malleswari, weightlifting, Sydney 2000; Saina Nehwal, badminton, London 2012; Mary Kom, boxing, London 2012).The bronze tally was raised to four by wrestler Sakshi Malik — and we would have been pretty happy if P.V.Sindhu had won a bronze too.Until, suddenly, there was the prospect of gold.At the Olympics, as in life, it’s a matter of managing expectations.Every four years, we as a nation build up our hopes, only to have them dashed to the ground when reality comes calling.Who builds up these expectations? ...

    Indian Express on Aug. 23, 2016, 12:02 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...However, the one from just last week was being driven by a 22-year old accompanied by four friends, the oldest of whom was 25.It was a wreck on Mumbai’s Western Express Highway, the road we all take to the airport.The other, taken a few weeks earlier, was on the newer Eastern Freeway and involved a family.No matter: the bodies must have looked identical — not human bodies at all, but crushed lives, the mortal remains probably having to be scraped off the metal and upholstery that remained.If that sounds gruesome, it was.Both accidents were due to speeding in excess of 120 kmph, complete madness on roads which aren’t made for reckless speeding.The Western Express Highway, in fact, has a variety of vehicles plying on it and also has crossroads and traffic lights, none of which lend themselves to speed driving. ...

    Deccan Chronicle on Aug. 22, 2016, 12:11 a.m.