Anindita Ghose (for Info only, not official)

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Anindita Ghose

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    ...The film’s central figure is Christian (the Danish actor Claes Bang), the curator of Stockholm’s X-Royal contemporary art museum. But this movie is not about a hero’s journey. It is about all of us. Christian’s museum is about to unveil a new exhibition, The Square, which is a 4×4m demarcated space in the museum’s courtyard. A plaque announces it as a sacred place that demands equality and the responsibility of helping whoever is inside. The idea, as Christian explains in a press conference, is that people act differently in different spaces. It is a social experiment based on the idea of relational aesthetics. However, Christian begins to question his commitment to these liberal values after his phone and wallet are stolen. Directed by Ruben Östlund, The Square makes us introspect about how we react in different moral and ethical situations. ...

    Live Mint on Oct. 20, 2017, 3:41 p.m.

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    ...Would the same people who pay hundreds of dollars to listen to Bell in concert discern his musical virtuosity? His performance was arranged by The Washington Post as an experiment in context, perception and priorities: “One of the finest classical musicians in the world, playing some of the most elegant music ever written on one of the most valuable violins ever made.” Not too many people stopped to listen and the final haul for his 43 minutes of playing was a pitiable $32.17 (around Rs2,070 now). The same year, Bell was awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Prize for outstanding achievement. In the experiment, a three-year-old was among the few who had strained to listen. Weingarten quotes the poet Billy Collins, who once laughingly observed that babies are born with a knowledge of poetry, because the lub-dub of the mother’s heart is in iambic meter. Then life slowly starts to choke the poetry out of us. ...

    Live Mint on June 9, 2017, 6:19 p.m.

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    ...I was disappointed when she graduated to email. WhatsApp this year was a first. The two incidents confirmed the app’s absolute takeover of my life. It feels like a foolish and faraway time when I used to be offended when people reached out on WhatsApp. I viewed it variously as a lack of formality, a lack of effort, or both. Then it started becoming functional: event invitations, sharing references with blouse tailors, tracking when someone was last online to understand why they weren’t responding to my important email when they were clearly doing less important things such as changing their display picture on WhatsApp. ...

    Live Mint on May 5, 2017, 11:56 a.m.

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    ...It disturbs me that the Bambaiyya-speaking urchin who starts off the film jumping into a pile of shit develops a south Bombay twang in his early teens and then speaks with a British accent as the young adult played by Dev Patel. I cannot put these thoughts away and “just go on the ride”, as I’m advised to do by the film’s many champions. I married a film critic, who, several years before I met him, had reviewed this movie glowingly, specifically saying: “The tiniest details clearly don’t matter. All that does matter is that everybody—repeat, everybody—gets up and dances.” Slumdog remains in my everyday life. Disagreements that hinge on taste, from the idea of chicken on pizza to silky evening shirts (for men), frequently manage to end with—“But you liked Slumdog.” Books and music foster disputes, but movies spawn highly-strung debates. ...

    Live Mint on April 7, 2017, 7:59 p.m.

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    ...Both reasons that prompted Italian fashion designer Maria Grazia Chiuri to draw from it for her debut collection for Dior. Chiuri first showed her collection in the gardens of the Musée Rodin during the Paris Fashion Week last September. It launches worldwide on Sunday, including at the brand’s stores in India, the Taj Mumbai, and Emporio, Delhi. Chiuri, 53, who comes to the brand after 17 years at Valentino, is the first woman to head Christian Dior, a 70-year-old fashion house built on the foundation of its feminine designs. It’s a position that makes her the most powerful woman in Parisian fashion, and perhaps the world, since Coco Chanel. In her official statement, Chiuri says she thought about being a woman, “who for the first time, has this opportunity and who must speak to modern women”. She wanted to create fashion that resembles the women of today, corresponding to their changing needs, breaking away from the silos of masculine/feminine, young/not-so-young, and reason/emotion, among others. ...

    Live Mint on Feb. 24, 2017, 8:33 p.m.

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    ...Last week, Beyoncé announced she was pregnant with twins. The photograph above is now the most-liked post in Instagram history: 10.1 million at the time of going to press. The first in a series of images the singer released across her own platforms, the photograph recruits every art historical trope of fertility and femininity. Beyoncé has always been meticulous about the image she presents of herself—in the past she has modelled herself on Elizabeth I, servicing the “Queen Bey” tag. But she is no longer content with the regal image she has built over the years with a complex and subliminal system of signs. Here her expression is commanding but calm. The lowered camera angle gives her beatific proportions. She wears no jewellery. Flowers rise behind her to form a halo. Here, she is a goddess. The rest of the shoot effectively communicates Beyoncé’s extraordinary capabilities. There are pictures of her buoyant underwater—in one of them she is upside down! ...

    Live Mint on Feb. 10, 2017, 8:13 p.m.