Anita Anand (for Info only, not official)

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Anita Anand

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    ... Until the discovery of diamond mines in Brazil in 1725, with the sole exception of a few black diamond crystals found in the mountains of Borneo, all the world’s diamonds came from India. Ancient Indian diamonds were all alluvial. They were not mined so much as sieved and extracted as natural crystals from the soft sands and gravels of ancient river beds. Originally ejected from the host rocks — kimberlite and lamproite — by primeval volcanoes, they were swept up by water and transported along rivers, until at last they came to rest when the river died, millions of years ago. Most such alluvial diamonds are tiny, natural octahedral crystals. Very occasionally, however, a diamond as large as a hen’s egg would be found — one such was the Koh-i-Noor. Today, the Koh-i-Noor is unquestionably the most famous jewel in the world. ...

    Indian Express on Dec. 10, 2016, midnight

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ... Until the discovery of diamond mines in Brazil in 1725, with the sole exception of a few black diamond crystals found in the mountains of Borneo, all the world’s diamonds came from India. Ancient Indian diamonds were all alluvial. They were not mined so much as sieved and extracted as natural crystals from the soft sands and gravels of ancient river beds. Originally ejected from the host rocks — kimberlite and lamproite — by primeval volcanoes, they were swept up by water and transported along rivers, until at last they came to rest when the river died, millions of years ago. Most such alluvial diamonds are tiny, natural octahedral crystals. Very occasionally, however, a diamond as large as a hen’s egg would be found — one such was the Koh-i-Noor. Today, the Koh-i-Noor is unquestionably the most famous jewel in the world. ...

    Indian Express on Dec. 10, 2016, midnight

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    Short extract

    ...Around six million people, a third of the entire population of Great Britain, were expected to attend the exhibition between 1 May and 11 October 1851.On the day the exhibition opened its doors, The Times, usually a sober and weighty newspaper, became positively giddy:Never before was so vast a multitude gathered together within the memory of man. The struggles of great nations in battle, the levies of whole races, never called forth such an army as thronged the streets of London on the 1st of May...The blazing arch of lucid glass with the hot sun flaming on its polished ribs and sides shone like the Koh-i-noor itself.The Koh-i-Noor could not have appeared at a more opportune time. Coinciding with the emergence of a popular press in Victorian Britain, hungry to fill its pages with tales of this most famous diamond, it was hardly surprising that the Koh-i-Noor whipped up such enthusiasm and interest among the British public. ...

    NDTV on Dec. 10, 2016, midnight