Anuja Chauhan (for Info only, not official)

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Anuja Chauhan

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    ...Which is funny since it’s been twelve years since the last movie, and twenty years since the first book.I love Bridget Jones for many many reasons—her yoyoing weight, her bruised, battered but always-ready-for-more-punishment heart, her loyalty to her friends.But most importantly, I love her zero-tolerance policy towards emotional fuckwittage.No emotional fuckwittage!Roars a roaringly drunk Bridget in book after book about a single girl’s life in the city.If this is not important to you, if you’re not invested in this relationship, if you’re scared of the M word, then butt out, buster, bollocks to you!I like that she’s unapologetic about what she wants.What she deserves.And what she’s entitled to.Nowadays, most people are not.They’re all (girls and boys alike) giving the oh oh, I love my single life, I wouldn’t give up my freedom for anything, let’s all just go out there and have beautiful experiences that enrich us ones.Basically, emotional fuckwittage. ...

    The Week on Oct. 2, 2016, midnight

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    ...Sure, she was almost 82, and quite unwell with Mixed Connective Tissue Disorder, which caused her to suffer from fatigue and reduced lung function, but she fully conned us into believing there was nothing much wrong with her.She was cheerful, energetic, engaged and she still enjoyed spicy food, the occasional shandy, a night out dancing and a game of cards.She lived in Australia, but kept up her dual citizenship, visiting me most summers in Delhi and then Bengaluru.She loved 'all the progress' India was making—she rejoiced over every new flyover, every sporting victory, every female global CEO of Indian origin, commending (though not watching) every episode of Quantico.But over the years, she also grew more and more bewildered by the state of the nation.She would often phone me, with questions and observations of all kinds.Beta, why are they beating up chamars for skinning a dead cow?How are noodles ayurvedic?Why does everybody shout so much on Indian TV?Why doesn't anybody respect Army officers anymore?I thought Arvind Kejriwal was a good, clean boy.But I am not so sure now. ...

    The Week on Sept. 18, 2016, midnight

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    ...It was a big-budget (for those days) mainstream project and its theme was caste prejudice.Nutan plays Sujata, an untouchable girl adopted by a kind Brahmin family, who however keep her slightly at an arm's length because, you know, she's 'low' caste and all.In spite of this, their pure Brahmin son manages to fall in love with her (which is where jalte hain jiske liye comes in.)Naturally, the parents are horrified.But then, his mother gets sick, needs an urgent blood transfusion and the only person to possess the same, rare blood group as her turns out to be the 'low'-caste girl, Sujata.Sujata donates the blood, mummy-papa realise that the caste system is all hogwash, Sujata and Sunil march off happily into the sunset together and the nascent nation learns a much required moral science lesson.Matlab, full-full paisa vasool. ...

    The Week on Aug. 21, 2016, midnight

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    ...Or rather, the nasal tube that was used to force-feed her five times a day.Irom Sharmila has declared that she's breaking her fast, striding out of room #1 in the special ward of the Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences in Imphal where she's been held under house-arrest all this time, contesting the Manipur polls, taking the fight to repeal AFSPA to Parliament, marrying her boyfriend Desmond Coutinho and jolly well having a normal life.Of course her minders, mother, brother, movement, state, are having a bunch of kittens each.See, goddesses in India are biddable creatures, held captive by their ‘devotees'.They're a wonderful, powerful symbol and venerated as such–and like Sita, or the countless sati matas, often asked to walk through fire to prove their purity and general godliness.Their power is immense—but essentially, unharnessed.They let their priests do the talking.And they certainly do not go about admitting to having boyfriends or developing inconvenient, personal, ungoddessy desires.Because that somehow makes them less goddessy. ...

    The Week on Aug. 7, 2016, midnight