Avijit Ghosh (for Info only, not official)

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Avijit Ghosh

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    ...#SakshiChaudhary from Haryana’s Bhiwani district struck gold in the 54 kg category at the World Youth Championship in Guwahati last month. She tells @timesofindia who inspired her to take up boxing #womenboxing pic.twitter.com/sKiPVCu4V0 — avijitghoshtoi (@avijitghoshtoi) December 10, 2017 Jyoti Gulia from Haryana’s Rohtak district, winner of gold medal in the 51 kg category at the World Youth Championship in Guwahati last month. She talks about her ultimate boxing dream #JyotiGulia from Haryana’s Rohtak district, winner of gold medal in the 51 kg category at the World Youth Championship in Guwahati last month. ...

    TOI on Dec. 10, 2017, 4:21 p.m.

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    ...I hadn’t heard of anything like that and ​his suggestion certainly aroused my curiosity. ​We drove over to a place where a push cart ​was ​ surrounded by ​a bunch of shivering but eager customers. A couple of cars and motorbikes were parked nearby. Everyone was ​either ​ slurping on the hot liquid or restlessly waiting for his turn. The ​winter ​ cold seemed to have deterred nobody. We waited patiently for the brew, much like ravenous dogs outside marriage kitchens. It was worth the wait. In four simple words, the soup was divine. My colleague decided to skip dinner and opted for two bowls. The main ingredient was ​,​ ​of course, ​ the kaala chane ka gruel which was poured from a container into the bowl. The soup was garnished with two teaspoonful of boiled black gram, fried croutons, a dollop of cream, a dash of melted butter and a sprinkling of fresh coriander leaves. Last week on another assignment to the same town, I decided to pay ​a second visit to the soup cart. ...

    TOI on Dec. 9, 2017, 7:08 p.m.

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    ...They live together in a rundown three-room house, just an Arnab Goswami shout away from the famed Bhiwani Boxing Club (BBC). There are 10 of them now. One of them, Guddan, is a daily wager’s daughter from western UP’s Baghpat district. Sonam has lost her father, and her mother toils on her farm in Churu, Rajasthan. Most others who come to train at the club are from similar disadvantaged backgrounds. It’s a tough life for the teenaged girls. Rustling up Rs 10,000 every month for food and boarding. Taking turns to cook after gruelling practice sessions. Battling mosquitos at night because repellants are a luxury. Yet they are driven by a fierce desire to outpunch every unkind cut life throws at them. For them, boxing offers a ticket out of poverty and anonymity. Most of them are medal winners at inter-school or university meets, state-level tournaments, even national championships. ...

    TOI on Dec. 3, 2017, 12:49 a.m.

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    ...He talks to Avijit Ghosh about the current state of Indian football: India U-17 football team’s performance in the ongoing World Cup has been appreciated. What is the biggest takeaway? The team’s biggest takeaway is the confidence gained by competing against quality teams. It was creditable that they kept their shape, stayed well organised and restricted scoring chances of opponents. Fitness level was exceptional. Above all, they got people interested in football and media coverage was extensive. Goalkeeper Dheeraj Moirangthem of Manipur was the find of the tournament. His shot stopping ability, positioning and awareness has been appreciated by many experts. Defender Anwar Ali of Punjab showed good positional sense. He was commanding in aerial duels and a hard tackler. Defender Jitendra Singh of Bengal was quick, agile and a tenacious man marker. However there are still discernible shortcomings. Finishing was poor and passing in the attacking third was either inaccurate or predictable. ...

    TOI on Oct. 23, 2017, 2 a.m.

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    ...Ten years later, the upstart event is the centrepiece of BCCI’s calendar. Last month, the winning bid for IPL’s TV and digital rights globally (till 2022) went for a record Rs 16,347.50 crore, roughly $2.55 billion. Perhaps it’s time to assess the blockbuster startup’s impact on the sport – its economy and its aftereffects on cricket watching culture. Over the years, the professional T20 league has made a bunch of super-rich cricketers even richer. But it has also put money in the hands of non A-listers. The most interesting money trivia in its 2017 edition wasn’t Rising Pune Supergiant shelling out an astronomical Rs 14.5 crore for England’s Ben Stokes. It was T Natarajan, a daily wager’s son from Tamil Nadu, getting Rs 3 crore and Mohammed Siraj, son of an auto driver, bought for Rs 2.6 crore. ...

    TOI on Oct. 6, 2017, 2 a.m.

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    ...Kumar’s latest work, Banaras and the Other, has been much-discussed and wildly feted in the city poetry circles. He talks to Avijit Ghosh about poetry, protests and other things that make life an irresistible mess Teaching political science, writing poetry. Is there a paradox out there? I find none. Without politics, there is no poetry, for ‘lions are made of sheep,’ as French polymath Paul Valery said. And ‘sheep are made of lions, too’ as AK Ramanujan said. Poetry is unannounced civil disobedience or Satyagraha. It is exceptional moment of uprising against the ‘power of anyone’. Following Aristotle, I am a ‘speaking political animal’ possessing the rare human capacity of speaking truth to the power that is. So, politics is a specific way of poetic life- the power of baring, beginning, and begetting possibilities. Like Jayanta Mahapatra, I started writing late and lived in a sort of exile at TISS until recently discovered by fellow Mumbai poets. I am afflicted by poetry. Hindi poet Kailash Vajapyee described poetry as hawa mein hastakshar, a signature in the wind. ...

    TOI on July 18, 2017, 12:53 p.m.

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    ...In hockey, it is the World Cup and the Olympics. In cricket, it is the ODI World Cup, and now to a lesser extent, the T20 World Cup. The next football World Cup is a year away and it will be played in Russia, where the Confederation Cup climaxed with Germany overcoming Chile 1-0 last Sunday. The next cricket ODI World Cup is scheduled for 2019. England and Wales, who hosted the just-concluded Champions Trophy, will be the organisers again. Germany is the reigning world champion in football. India, losing semifinalist in the previous T20 and ODI World Cups, is hoping to mount a challenge for cricket’s most coveted prize. But the two countries seem to be getting ready for the biggest tournaments in two different sports in rather contrasting ways. In the Confederation Cup, coach Joachim Low kept the big names of German football out of the squad. No Muller. No Kroos. No Neuer. No member in the squad of 23 was more than 29 years of age. The team was led by Julian Draxler, who had 23 caps but only 23 years old. ...

    TOI on July 4, 2017, 12:15 p.m.

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    ...Her distinctive voice added lilt and zest to the compositions of her husband Salil Chowdhury, a master of melodies. Here are some rare tracks sung by her in Hindi films: O meri praan sajni Champawati aa ja: Film: Annadata (1972): A delectable duet where the chorus carries the unmistakable stamp of composer Salil Chowdhury’s genius. Lead pair Anil Dhawan and Jaya Bhaduri make for a reticent middle-class pair who prefer listening to love rather than talk about it. Kishore Kumar lends his voice to Gopi Krishna, the versatile Kathak dancer, choreographer and actor. Sabita sings for the fair and lovely Madhumati, one of the most popular Bollywood dancers of her time. Yogesh is the lyricist. Kancha le kanchi lai lajo: Film: Madhumati (1958): Director Bimal Roy’s musical superhit was embellished by some of the most popular tunes of Salil Chowdhury. ...

    TOI on July 1, 2017, 6:13 p.m.