Badri Narayan (for Info only, not official)

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Badri Narayan

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    ...One meaning is linked with the construction of Ram Mandir at Ayodhya; the other meaning is linked with the Babri Masjid and the third meaning is linked with the death of B.R. Ambedkar. It bears dual emotion. It produces double memory for people. For some, it is a comfortable memory and for others, it is an uncomfortable memory. Those who have an uncomfortable memory, they want to forget 6 December. Those who have comfortable memories, they want to remember but not continuously —only at special occasions such as a political meeting or a rally or through the media and political mobilization. Through this medium, they remember the occasion. Around the date, political rallies take place, then they remember, but it is not in their continuous memory. Is there political potential in the issue? If we take 6 December as a symbol which brings back memories, can it help strengthen a political force? Is the potential still there? ...

    Live Mint on Dec. 6, 2017, 4:09 a.m.

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    ...Is this, then, the beginning of a new phase of Dalit moblisation? Whatever be the outcome of the RSS outreach, Mayawati has a tough battle ahead. In the past two decades, she had consolidated the Dalit vote, achieved a polarisation of the bahujan and looked poised to disseminate her politics among the sarvajan. Today, her political career is at a crossroads. Her sarvajan outreach has receded to the background as she is busy saving her Dalit base. This follows the dominant view that a section of the Dalits moved away from the BSP and voted for the BJP in the 2017 UP assembly election. One aspect of the subaltern assertion in recent times is that every Dalit and backward community has become conscious of its specific caste identity. ...

    Indian Express on Sept. 11, 2017, 12:19 a.m.

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    ...The party is using social media as a campaign vehicle. Slogans such as “Behenji ko aane do” are common on the party’s social media platforms and BSP representatives are active on Twitter. One can discern a different BSP in the party’s campaign strategies in the ongoing UP election. Earlier, the party did not participate in media debates and it was not visible on social media. The BSP’s founder Kanshi Ram used to describe the media as “Manuvadi” and claimed it distorted the party’s arguments. But now, Mayawati has been briefing the press regularly and has also been organising frequent press conferences. The party is also trying to woo voters through videos on YouTube and has roped in Bollywood singers. ...

    Indian Express on Feb. 20, 2017, 12:02 a.m.

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    ...The BJP and Congress will soon announce their list of candidates. The Samajwadi Party has already released two sets of lists — one comprises candidates belonging to Akhilesh’s group and the second list has names of candidates in the Mulayam faction. A majority of the candidates are common to both the lists, the tussle is only over a few seats. The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) had begun preparing the list of its candidates soon after the 2014 general elections. The party had also announced the names of most of its candidates some time ago; these candidates are already active in their respective constituencies. ...

    Indian Express on Jan. 11, 2017, 12:03 a.m.

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    ...The media and political analysts discuss the possibility of the success or failure of any political party on the basis of the numerical percentage of its core voters. Statistical analysis looks at these castes and communities as a homogeneous vote bank, but in reality they are not so. The deep-rooted desire for recognition and the aspiration for political participation lure the numerically large and influential castes among Dalits and backwards to vote in favour of a particular political party. Even among these social groups, the most marginalised — which are scattered and numerically less — follow a different voting pattern. Dalits, who comprise about 21.6 per cent of the population of Uttar Pradesh, are widely considered to form the base of the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP). On analysing the grassroot reality, we find that among the large number of Dalit castes, it is only the Jatavs who are the core voters for BSP. ...

    Indian Express on Dec. 15, 2016, 12:02 a.m.

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    ...BSP Chief Mayawati.Express Photo by Prem Nath Pandey.The politics of the Uttar Pradesh assembly elections has reached an interesting juncture.All the political parties have tightened their belts for mission 2017 and are following different strategies to fulfil it.The Samajwadi Party (SP) is taking out advertisements on news channels and newspapers announcing new policies.The grand rally of Prime Minister Narendra Modi during the BJP national executive at Allahabad in and the rallies organised by Amit Shah in various parts of UP since are a part of the BJP’s plan to capture UP.The Congress has also made a move by organising road shows, meetings and discussions.The BSP is not lagging behind.BSP supremo Mayawati organised four big “Sarvajan Hitae, Sarvajan Sukhay” (for the peace and prosperity of all) rallies between August 20 and September 12 in various parts of UP.Keeping its electoral strategy in mind, the BSP organised these rallies in Agra, Azamgarh, Allahabad and Saharanpur.The locations were chosen strategically — these are regions where the BSP has a strong base among the Dalits. ...

    Indian Express on Sept. 16, 2016, 12:02 a.m.

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    ...He says, “Hegel remarks somewhere that all great world-historic facts and personages appear, so to speak, twice.He forgot to add: The first time as tragedy, the second time as farce.” Today this proverb seems apt to analyse Dalits, their traditional occupations and the atrocities they have to face because these jobs are considered “menial”.The protests by Dalit groups and their refusal to engage in their “traditional” occupations after young Dalit men were beaten up on charges of cow slaughter in Una is not without precedent.With the support of the laws against untouchability promulgated after Independence, and under the influence of Dalit thinkers like Ambedkar and Jagjivan Ram, Dalits, especially the Jatavs of UP, began a movement to put an end to traditional occupations like murda maveshi (dealing with dead cattle).This movement spread in the villages of UP between 1950-1980 and was called the Nara Maveshi movement.The men of the Jatav caste refused to dispose of the carcasses of animals. ...

    Indian Express on Aug. 15, 2016, 3:48 a.m.

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    ...I dwell on one such issue for the 2014 election.It is ironic that though Babu Jagjivan Ram was irrelevant during his last days, he is once again emerging as a powerful symbol in Dalit politics.The discourse of Ambedkarite politics that emerged in the 1980s in the Hindi heartland had consigned him to a mere footnote in history, especially after his demise.Jagjivan Ram's politics was depicted as anti-Ambedkar, and he was cast in a poor light.According to a news item published in Amar Ujala on October 13, "Congress Ko Dalit Virodhi Batane Ki Muhim Chalayegi Baspa", the BSP instructed its coordinators in Lucknow to launch a campaign in Uttar Pradesh to uncover the Congress's "anti-Dalit face". ...

    Indian Express on Oct. 29, 2013, 12:26 a.m.