Biju Dominic (for Info only, not official)

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Biju Dominic

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    ...Within a short period thereafter, dozens of women, many of them high-profile, came forward to talk about their bad experiences with Weinstein. Then began the flood—a torrent of complaints against high-profile men in entertainment, media, politics and academia started pouring in. Countless women have been caught in power dynamics beyond their control. In industries like the entertainment business, the potential and talent is decided not by academic qualifications, but by an individual, almost always a male, using subjective factors. In these cases, the chances of exploitation are high. Sexual harassment in the entertainment industry has long been an open secret. But the wave of complaints on sexual harassment and the subsequent reactions from all walks of life have come as a surprise. The #MeToo campaign is spreading. Almost every day the name of a new high-profile sex offender is revealed. ...

    Live Mint on Dec. 6, 2017, 11:39 p.m.

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    ...The famous Bill Bernbach’s “You’re not Alice?” advertisement for American Airlines about airline staff who were so caring that travellers married them epitomized the behaviour of an airline staff then. But in recent times, the focus on customer care as a core business strategy seems to have lost its importance. Very few service providers have a loyalty programme. Filing a customer complaint has been made not just difficult, but almost impossible. The opportunity to speak to a customer service representative is now a rarity. Twitter and Facebook pages respond with only canned replies. Why has customer service lost its lustre? India is now a growing economy. Various economic forces within the country are creating a large pool of new customers on a regular basis. ...

    Live Mint on Nov. 22, 2017, 11:12 p.m.

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    ...According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, companies lose nearly 5% of their revenue each year to employee and executive fraud. Back home in India, just the cost of electricity stolen alone amounts close to Rs15,000 crore. Dishonesty has a high emotional cost too. An organization that loses trust among its customers due to one dishonest act of their employees will have to demonstrate its honesty in many more occasions just to even stand a chance of conveying to its customers that it has now mended its ways. Dishonest behaviour has a direct economic impact on a country or an organization. Making humans a bit more honest might be the behaviour change that would bring the highest economic benefit to countries and organizations. Easier said than done, though. Across the world, several steps have been taken to curb dishonest practices. ...

    Live Mint on Oct. 26, 2017, 12:07 a.m.

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    ...Adam Smith’s The Theory Of Moral Sentiments, published in 1759, contained many thoughts that behavioural economists are now focusing on. Thaler is hopeful that behavioural economics will have an impact even on macroeconomics, an area over which behavioural approaches have had little sway, thereby influencing big picture issues like monetary and fiscal policies. Already Thaler’s work has shown excellent potential to solve many real-life problems like saving for retirement and inducing organ donation. But even he would admit that developing an enriched version of economics with human behaviour at its centre is far from complete. What needs to be done to further democratize the application of behavioural economics? ...

    Live Mint on Oct. 12, 2017, 2:22 a.m.

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    ...Social evils do not remedy themselves with time. One needs to specifically work towards solutions to mitigate the problem. Any solution to the psychological toll of smartphones should accept the truth that the penetration and usage of smartphones will continue to increase manifold. So a Luddite-like response of “let’s ban smartphones” is as foolhardy as the cliched “Life was much better back in the villages; everybody back to the farm” response to modernity. The core problem caused by the smartphones can be best described as a reduction in social capital. Social capital can be understood as networks of social relations in a society which are characterized by norms of trust and reciprocity and which facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutual benefit among members of a society. ...

    Live Mint on Sept. 28, 2017, 12:05 a.m.

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    ...At the same time, news reports of youngsters committing suicide for various reasons are a daily feature in newspapers. Although on the surface, the causes of these two sets of deaths appear different, on closer inspection, they seem to emanate from a common cause. The immediate cause for deaths in Gorakhpur hospitals is attributed to non-availability of oxygen cylinders. Looking back on a temporal scale for the reasons for the non-availability of oxygen cylinders in Gorakhpur, one sees a much larger problem: decades of apathy, gross negligence towards maternal and child health in the state and country, leading to the non-availability of the most vital ingredient of life, oxygen. The recent teenage suicides have been attributed to internet games like the Blue Whale Challenge, and the failure to perform well in competitive exams, etc. ...

    Live Mint on Sept. 13, 2017, 11:35 p.m.

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    ...Earlier terrorist attacks involved a long process—procurement explosive materials, developing the expertise to make explosives, having the ability to plant these explosives without detection, etc. The recent terrorist attacks have shown that the only resource that is required to launch a terrorist attack anywhere in the world is the ability to drive a vehicle. In this new scenario, one needs a total rethink about our counterterrorism strategies. The 11 September 2001 attack on World Trade Center brought in a dramatic new focus on terrorism. The immediate response to terrorism after the attack was the classic kinetic approach of targeted killing and arresting of terrorists. Soon policy makers realized that killing terrorists only helped terrorist organizations recruit a new generation of committed terrorists. ...

    Live Mint on Aug. 31, 2017, 5:08 a.m.

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    ...Only 29% of the millennials are really committed to their job and the organization they work for. Millennials are expected to hold 15-20 different jobs in the course of their working life. For many of the previous generation, jobs for life was the norm. Some of them even had the name of their organization as part of their unofficial name. As those born in the 21st century become part of the workforce, the critical question will be how to build a strong relationship between an employee and the organization they work for. Many management experts made us believe that a Big Hairy Audacious Goal (BHAG) and a shared value system are the best drivers for creating a sense of purpose within an organization. Beautifully worded memos, training programmes at exotic holiday destinations and large posters plastered all around the office proclaim the new audacious goals, vision, and values. ...

    Live Mint on Aug. 17, 2017, 4:31 a.m.