Chris Bryant (for Info only, not official)

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Chris Bryant

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    ...I don’t want to buy into the distribution machine like GM did by paying $500 million for a 10% stake in Lyft.” I disagree with the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV boss about many things, but he’s right to be dubious about his industry’s splashing of cash on “mobility services”: a catch-all for stuff like ride-hailing and car-sharing. While the shift from combustion engine to electric vehicles is happening and autonomous driving will come too, in time, we’re a long way from automatic car capsules à la Minority Report. Yet carmakers have been at it again this week. Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) disclosed a $25 million investment in Lyft, while Daimler AG took part in a $500 million funding round for Careem, a Middle East ride-hailing service. ...

    Live Mint on June 16, 2017, 2:55 p.m.

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    ...He’s going to bring those jobs home. Put aside for a moment how moving jobs back to a country with high costs gives companies an incentive to automate. There’s a bigger problem: After displacing US manufacturing workers, robots are poised to do the same in developing economies, too. It will be hard to re-shore jobs that no longer exist. It took 50 years for the world to install the first million industrial robots. The next million will take only eight, according to Macquarie. Importantly, much of the recent growth happened outside the US, in particular in China, which has an aging population and where wages have risen. In some respects that’s a good thing, of course. Working on a production line is monotonous, and sometimes dangerous. However, building a large manufacturing sector has traditionally been the path emerging economies have taken to raise living standards. ...

    Live Mint on Jan. 9, 2017, 9:26 a.m.

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    ...Warren East, a well-regarded technology enthusiast, may end up crushed by the size of the task. East, 55, spent more than a decade transforming UK chip designer ARM Holdings into a world-beater. ARM was bought this year by Japan’s SoftBank for a staggering £24 billion ($29.4 billion), suggesting he did a good job. Few would have begrudged him spending the rest of his professional life holding cushy non-executive roles, giving speeches and playing his beloved church organ on weekends. But at Rolls-Royce he’s opted for arguably the toughest job in British industry. After a difficult first 18 months, there’s little relief in sight in 2017 for the jet engine and turbine maker. True, a rebound in oil prices may help Rolls-Royce’s struggling marine division. Even so, the group probably won’t generate much cash flow next year, after an expected outflow of as much as £300 million in 2016. ...

    Live Mint on Dec. 30, 2016, 3:54 p.m.