Dileep Padgaonkar (for Info only, not official)

author

Dileep Padgaonkar

We are collecting authors'profile. As soon as we get, we update it. Please note this is not official profile. The information including photo is collected from web.

| Contact |

| twitter |

| Linkedin |

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...But now that the unthinkable has come to pass it is at a loss to figure out how to adjust to what a French weekly called ‘Trump-apocalypse’. Trump’s election comes at a time when the continent has had to contend with serious problems on multiple fronts. It could do precious little to arrest, let alone roll back, Russia’s muscle flexing in the Ukraine and the takeover of Crimea. Add to this the massive influx of refugees, especially from Syria, jihadi terror attacks, niggardly economic growth and high levels of unemployment. To boot there is a pervasive fear that Brexit heralds the unravelling of the European Union. Taken together, these factors have triggered a rightward lurch in one European country after another. Hungary and Poland already have autocratic, right-wing governments. Austria could well have one soon. In France, the popularity of Marine Le Pen, leader of the extreme rightist National Front, is on the ascendant. ...

    TOI on Nov. 12, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...But the campaign for it is already underway. Niggardly economic growth, unemployment, steady dismantlement of the welfare state and the Brexit shock are some of the issues that pit one party against another. Overriding them all however is this question: Does the presence of a large, if diversified, Muslim community in France threaten to dispossess French society of what has held it together in the past – culture, language, lifestyles and, above all, the republican values that have sustained it for more than two centuries? The latter include a single legal system for all citizens, adherence to basic freedoms, gender equality and a strict separation of religion from the public sphere. ...

    TOI on Oct. 15, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...He deserves to be better known, especially by those active in the media today, because he laid the foundations of modern Indian journalism. Few publications, if any, commanded as much respect and influence on opinion and decision makers across undivided India as the two journals he founded and edited during the first four decades of the 20th century: The Modern Review (in English) and Prabasi (in Bengali). Both journals welcomed in their pages contributors who held diverse, even divergent, views on issues related to India’s past, present and future trajectory. The editor himself was an ardent nationalist and liberal. And though he laid store by facts and figures to make his case in his own articles, he could never, as a nationalist, be detached about British rule in India. He considered it his mission to deprive it of all moral justification. His liberalism was obvious from the wide range of topics – politics and the economy, social reform and new tendencies in the arts and literature – both journals covered. ...

    TOI on Sept. 17, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...However, it would be foolhardy not to acknowledge the significant change in the Modi government’s narrative on Kashmir – a narrative that has been endorsed, in some measure or the other, by the opposition parties both in Parliament as well as in the state. The statements of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and home minister Rajnath Singh in the past fortnight are indeed a far cry from the rigid statements of some of their ministerial colleagues made in the wake of the mass protests that followed the killing of Hizb commander Burhan Wani. There was no trace of this rigidity when the PM met opposition leaders from J&K or later in his radio address. Such a conspicuous absence indeed signalled a salutary departure from the muscular rhetoric of the past. Modi reportedly expressed his “deep concern and pain at the prevailing situation”. ...

    TOI on Sept. 5, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...The court hearings began on August 7 and continued for four days. The defence lawyer was Mohammad Ali Jinnah. The district magistrate in Pune asked him to sign a bond and two sureties. He did that. But he also went on appeal to the high court. The two British judges who heard the appeal agreed that the substance of Tilak’s speech was objectionable. But was it seditious? Did it ‘create hatred, contempt and dissatisfaction for the government’ in the minds of the listeners? The judges couldn’t agree. But in the end, the court, acknowledging the force of Jinnah’s arguments, reversed the order of the district magistrate. In the process, they overturned a definition of sedition by a judge that had led to Tilak’s conviction in another case in 1897: the ‘absence of sedition’ was no longer valid as an ‘interpretation of sedition’. ...

    TOI on Aug. 20, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...Such neglect has been counterproductive for it is precisely during the interregnum that the animus against the Indian state in the Valley gathers momentum. The MP who forcefully drove home this point during this week’s debate in the House was Muzaffar Hussain Baig of PDP. His party governs J&K in alliance with BJP. He reiterated what has been known all along: the ham-handed manner in which Delhi has dealt with successive state chief ministers, the erosion of state powers guaranteed by the special status it enjoys in the Constitution, the use of excessive force against the protestors and so forth. This was not quite the burden of the speeches of BJP MPs. They held Pakistan entirely responsible for the turmoil in the Valley. Home minister Rajnath Singh argued that the protestors were a ‘misguided’ lot and that Delhi would open channels to them once calm returns. ...

    TOI on July 23, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...Peace and normalcy would follow suit. That hasn’t happened. The nature of militancy itself has changed. The militants who attack security forces are increasingly local youth who are well-educated and who belong to well-to-do families. How many of them have crossed the border to receive training and procure arms is still a matter of conjecture. But growing evidence suggests that these are home-grown elements who no longer rely entirely on Pakistani largesse to wage their violent struggle against the Indian state. Militancy has also acquired pernicious religious overtones. ...

    TOI on July 12, 2016, 2 a.m.

    Media Object

    Short extract

    ...One is therefore well within one’s right to fear that they might again rake up the unresolved Babri Masjid-Ram Janmabhumi dispute to polarise the electorate. Should this come to pass, opponents of the Sangh Parivar can be trusted to challenge every textual, historical and archaeological evidence that seeks to prove that the Muslim invader Babur had ordered the destruction of a temple dedicated to Lord Ram in Ayodhya and built a mosque in its place. They will continue, as in the past, to also contest the antiquity of such a temple and indeed to argue that the birthplace of Lord Ram – who isn’t a historical figure in their eyes – is a question of a communally-driven conjecture. In other words, a renewed controversy will once again pit the claims of ‘faith’ against the claims of reason, the law and the Constitution. ...

    TOI on June 25, 2016, 2 a.m.