Dipankar De Sarkar (for Info only, not official)

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Dipankar De Sarkar

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    ...I’ll explain. That Delhi’s air is among the foulest is well known—it’s close to being declared a hardship assignment for foreign diplomats. What is new is that we now have a much better idea of exactly what this is costing the residents of Delhi in terms of their health and general well-being. It’s an internationally accepted measure called DALY, short for Disability Adjusted Life Years, and it is aimed at explaining what we see around ourselves every day—at work, on the street and at home. This measure gives you a good picture of the cost of a disease, or condition or environmental risk—not only in terms of death. One DALY, according the World Health Organization (WHO), is one full year of lost healthy living per 1,000 population (in India, per 100,000). ...

    Live Mint on Nov. 17, 2017, 4:52 a.m.

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    ...Many are located in and around a thoroughfare called the Strand—inhabiting roughly an area of a couple of square miles in central London if you keep Trafalgar Square at its centre. Many of them are soaked in the history of the British empire, remnants of a colonial era when members would plot how the world was run over drinks. British colonialism and British gentlemen’s clubs are closely linked. Britons returning from colonies where they demanded attention when they didn’t get it hankered after similar luxuries at home. India meant death from tropical diseases for many, malaria among them. ...

    Live Mint on Nov. 3, 2017, 1:07 a.m.

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    ...Arguably the most keenly followed central banker in the world—a man who resolutely insisted on civility and restraint in public debate—the papers have never seemed the same since the economist’s departure. Oh wait, he is back—in his grey suit, no less. And, not surprisingly, the papers have begun to sing again. The reason is a book by Rajan, called I Do What I Do, which is a collection of his speeches and writings mainly on monetary policymaking in India and other emerging nations. But the timing of its publication was almost spooky in its newsworthiness, coming within days of RBI announcing that banks had received 99% of the invalidated high-denomination notes, a statement that threw a cloud on the original aims of demonetisation. ...

    Live Mint on Sept. 8, 2017, 6:12 a.m.

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    ...Arguably the most keenly followed central banker in the world—a man who resolutely insisted on civility and restraint in public debate—the papers have never seemed the same since the economist’s departure. Oh wait, he is back—in his grey suit, no less. And, not surprisingly, the papers have begun to sing again. The reason is a book by Rajan, called I Do What I Do, which is a collection of his speeches and writings mainly on monetary policymaking in India and other emerging nations. But the timing of its publication was almost spooky in its newsworthiness, coming within days of RBI announcing that banks had received 99% of the invalidated high-denomination notes, a statement that threw a cloud on the original aims of demonetisation. ...

    Live Mint on Sept. 8, 2017, 6:12 a.m.

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    ...Both the events were peaceful protest marches. The first was a protest by scientists, researchers and university students who wanted to focus on two demands: the need to confront growing obscurantist and anti-science thinking in India and, secondly, to invest more into science and technology and its teaching. According to organizers Breakthrough Science Society, the event was held in 40 major cities and attracted 1,000 scientists, up to 8,000 research scholars and an astonishing 40,000 students. The second march was by rationalists and anti-superstition activists. ...

    Live Mint on Aug. 25, 2017, 5:35 p.m.

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    ...But two failures blight India’s accomplishments. Poverty is persistent and grinding—more than 27 million people, that is 22% of Indians, live in conditions of squalor and extreme poverty, earning $1.90 or less a day, according to the World Bank. And there is the related problem of corruption—as intractable as it was at the birth of independent India. In 1947, the problems were different. In that year, India legislated an anti-corruption Act over worries of war-related corruption. ...

    Live Mint on Aug. 11, 2017, 5:24 a.m.

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    ...After all of the British troops are rescued, the British naval commander stays back on the French beach, for he has to now evacuate the French. More From Livemint » Already hailed as a “masterpiece” by some critics, Dunkirk, in the style of modern war films, aims to drown the viewer in the vicarious fear and glory of war itself. It’s the mother of realistic films, but it’s a miserable failure in the way it airbrushes Indian soldiers out of Dunkirk. I say ‘Indian’ because this was before Partition, but really these soldiers were—perhaps to a man—Pakistani muleteers from the province of Punjab. They were among 2.5 million soldiers from undivided India who took part in World War II. Dunkirk was the very first theatre of operation for Indian soldiers. ...

    Live Mint on July 28, 2017, 4:43 a.m.

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    ...‘The best Prime Minister India never had’ is a headliner’s favourite. Yet, we don’t know for certain if the man who began life as a lecturer in political science (he read political science, history and law in university) ever thought he could have a realistic shot at becoming Prime Minister from the ranks of dynastic Congress. The first of possible two chances came after the assassination of Indira Gandhi in October 1984. As finance minister, he was No. 2 in her cabinet. However, according to her secretary P.C. Alexander, Mukherjee readily agreed when Indira’s son Rajiv Gandhi was mentioned as a consensus choice, rejecting suggestions that Mukherjee himself take over as interim premier. Rumours to the contrary, said Alexander, were spread by Mukherjee’s rivals in the Congress. ...

    Live Mint on July 14, 2017, 1:03 a.m.