Eben Moglen (for Info only, not official)

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Eben Moglen

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    ...Second, they would like to know just what the outlines of this right should be. Privacy is, as Brandeis and Warren said in 1894, “the right most valued by civilised men”, “the right to be left alone”. But in our age, the age of the internet, the right to be left alone includes also the right not to be put out there, or exposed involuntarily. Forced disclosure of the information that comprises our identities, in the age of biometric identification, social profiles, and cashless economic transactions, damages an essential component of all personal liberties. Whether the individual’s information is used on its own, or is analysed, profiled, or linked in the “social graph” to that of other related persons, forced disclosure of personal information in today’s society creates power in the state which receives that information. ...

    TOI on July 25, 2017, 2:02 a.m.

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    ...It will be considering these questions as will the highest constitutional courts of the United States, the European Union and its members, South Africa, or post-European Britain. A powerful court speaking for the world’s largest democracy on issues of privacy, expressive rights, surveillance, identity control and the other similar matters now coming to the fore in all societies will be immensely influential. All of which leads me to regard with puzzlement the efforts the Supreme Court is apparently taking just now to avoid speaking at all on the most important of current questions, not just for India, but for humanity. ...

    TOI on April 11, 2017, 2 a.m.

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    ...The theft of data was attributed to “state-sponsored” hackers, which some informed sources in California and Washington, D.C. said meant the Chinese secret service. Subsequently, claims emerged about a cracker selling personal information of Yahoo! account users on the dark Web. The company’s failure to discover or report the loss for two years will raise enormous problems for its embattled chief executive, Marissa Mayer, not to mention its covert participation in the surveillance of the incoming emails of its users. But it will be even more costly for the U.S. telecom giant, Verizon, which agreed to pay a bargain basement amount of $4.8 billion for the company in July. In the U.S., class action litigation for consumers’ damages from the loss of their private information (including mobile phone numbers, passwords, and addresses) is inevitable, and will be costly: Yahoo! may ultimately owe the people harmed by this theft far more than Verizon was willing to pay for it. ...

    The Hindu on Oct. 19, 2016, 12:37 a.m.